Wanderlust

Synergy

Architectural detail, Santa Maria la Blanca,Toledo, Spain

Architectural detail from Santa María la Blanca in Toledo, Spain. Originally built as early as CE 180 as a synagogue, Saint Mary the White is now a museum owned and preserved by the Catholic Church. The use of Mudéjar (Moorish) architecture for a Jewish place of worship during the reign of King Alfonso VIII of Castile is seen by many as a symbol of the co-existence during the Middle Ages of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism in what is now Spain.  In 1405, the Jews were violently expelled from the synagogue, and it was used as a church, a monastery, and later, a sword workshop. The building, the third most visited historic site in Toledo, was declared a national memorial in 1856 and restored.  It is currently not used for religious purposes.

Discovering beautiful places like this is how I salve my wanderlust.

 

WPC: Wanderlust

Tuesday’s Photo Challenge: RGB

Almudena Modern RGB

Ceiling decoration, Almudena Cathedral, Madrid, Spain

Almudena Cathedral is the seat of the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Madrid. Begun in 1879, the Gothic revival style church was not completed until 1993, when it was consecrated by Pope John Paul II.  Most interior decorations are contemporary, although art displayed in the side chapels is a mixture of traditional and modern.

 

 

 

 

Join Frank’s Tuesday Photo Challenge: RGB

Juxtaposing Styles

When Moorish Meets Renaissance

Detail from the Mezquita, the Great Mosque of Cordoba, which combines portions of a Moorish mosque and a Ren, Cordoba, Spain

Detail from the interior of the Mezquita, the Great Mosque of Cordoba. Originally a Moorish mosque begun in AD 711,  when  Córdoba returned to Christian rule in 1236 during the Reconquista, the mosque was converted to a Roman Catholic church. In the 16th century, a Renaissance cathedral nave was built in the middle of the mosque.

Join Paula’s Thursday’s Special: Juxtaposition

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