CFFC: In the Photo -Week 1

Window with Bricks and Bush

Vacant building, backstreets of Aveiro, Portugal

Join Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: In the Photo – Week 1

One Word Sunday: Giant

Rescued Giants

Temple of Nefertari, Abu Simbel, Egypt

The Temple of Nefertari is one of two massive 13th-century BCE rock-cut temples at Abu Simbel, a village in Nubia, part of southern Egypt. They are dedicated to Pharaoh Ramses II  and his favorite wife, Nefertari, whose giant relief  images decorate the of the temple, and commemorate the Pharoah’s victory at the Battle of Kadesh. Neferatri wasn’t granted equal status on the temple dedicated to Ramses II, who had an inflated ego based upon the number of representations of himself he commissioned.

Abu Simbel is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the “Nubian Monuments.”  Between 1960 and 1980, through the use of international campaign, 19 temples or monuments were rescued from the rising waters of Lake Nasser after construction of the Aswan High Dam on the Nile River. The monuments were dismantled, carved up and moved to other sites. Fifteen were reassembled in six groups along the shores of the lake; Egypt donated four temples to countries whose efforts had greatly contributed to the success of the salvage and rescue operation. Between 1964 and 1968, Abu Simbel was cut into blocks, dismantled and relocated to a location 65 meters higher than its original location on the western bank of the Nile River.

Join Debbie at Travel With Intent for her One Word Sunday Photo Challenge: Giant

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Wonder

Architecture of Light

Alcobaça Monastery, Early Gothic Church, Cistercian Style, consecrated in 1252, Portugal

I was in awe the moment I entered the Alcobaça Monastery, located in Alcobaça, Portugal. The simplicity and sense of lightness was such a contrast to other Gothic churches I had visited. Part of a large complex of monastic buildings, the church was the first Gothic style building in Portugal, following the precepts of the Cistercian Order, with its clean lines, void of decoration except for column capitals and illuminated by rows of windows. The rational style of Cistercian architecture was intended for utilitarian and liturgical purposes, without distractions. The church was consecrated in 1252.  Alcobaça is the largest church in Portugal. Click for information on Cistercian architecture.

Join Lens-Artists Photo Challenge: Wonder

Week one of a wonder(ful) new photo challenge created by fellow bloggers.  Subscribe to all 4 moderator blogs to receive the challenge each week.

Week 1 – Patti of https://pilotfishblog.com/

Week 2 – Ann-Christine aka Leya of https://lagottocattleya.wordpress.com/

Week 3 – Amy of https://shareandconnect.wordpress.com/

Week 4 – Tina of https://travelsandtrifles.wordpress.com/

Timeworn

Rusty Rosettes

Door Detail, Art Nouveau House, Aveiro, Portugal

Join Weekly Prompt’s Photo Challenge: Timeworn

A Photo A Week: Lights At Night

Temple Night Lights

Interior Rooms, Temple of Luxor, Luxor, Egypt

Join Nancy’s A Photo A Week: Lights at Night

One Word Sunday: Circle

Circles

Ceiling Decoration, Queen’s Boudoir, Palace of Queluz (Palácio de Queluz), 

Ceiling decoration from the Queen’s Boudoir in the Palace of Queluz (Palácio de Queluz), an 18th-century Portuguese rococo palace, located at Queluz, now a suburb of Lisbon. Construction began in 1747 as a summer retreat for Dom Pedro of Braganza. He later married  his niece, Maria  (December 1734–March 1816). In 1777, Maria became Dona Maria I, Queen of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves; Dom Pedro became king consort. The early years of Maria’s reign were successful, but following Dom Pedro’s death in 1786, she grew increasingly unstable, suffering from religious mania and melancholia. Her mental illness made her incapable of handling state affairs after 1792. In 1794, Queen Maria and her court took up official residence at Queluz, where she could be shielded from the public. Queluz Palace remained the official residence of the Portuguese prince regent John V, Maria’s eldest son, and the royal family although he ruled from Lisbon and the palace at Mafra. In 1807 the royal family, including Maria, fled to the Portuguese colony of Brazil following the French invasion of Portugal. Maria died in Brazil in 1816; she was known as Maria the Pious (in Portugal), or Maria the Mad (in Brazil).

Join Debbie for One Word Sunday: Circle

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