Faux Flowers

Bridal Shower Favors, painted by my sister

Bridal shower favors, painted by my sister. We gave a bridal shower for my nephew’s fiance when I was in Alaska in June. My sister paints glass and she and the bride-to-be painted the ornaments. Wild roses from Alaska.

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Floral Fantasies

Topkapi Tiles

Turkish glazed tiles from the Topkapi Palace in Istanbul.

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Sculpture Imprisioned

Locked Up in Lisbon

During repairs at Miradouro de São Pedro de Alcantara,  a miradouros (viewpoint) and garden with a panoramic view of Lisbon, the sculptures normally in the garden area were behind a fence for security.

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Twisted Iron

Detail from gate to a tomb/chapel, Aarhus Cathedral, Denmark

Detail of a wrought iron gate in front of a tomb/chapel, 1696. Aarhus Cathedral, Aarhus, Denmark.

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Color Your World: Catching Up

The Artistry of Guo Pei

It’s in the Details

Purse, Ensemble, Guo Pei, Bowers Museum, Santa Ana, California, 2019

Apricot

Embroidered detail from Dress Ensemble, Guo Pei, Bowers Museum, Santa Ana, California, 2019

Aquamarine and Banana Mania

Jacket Detail from ensemble, Guo Pei, Bowers Museum, Santa Ana, California, 2019

Atomic Orange

Details from three of the ensembles that are part of Guo Pei: Couture Beyond, organized by the Bowers Museum in collaboration with Guo Pei’s Rose Studios, SCAD FASH Museum of Fashion + Film and SCAD: The University for Creative Careers. It runs through July 14, 2019 at the Bowers Museum in Santa Ana, California.

 

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Color Your World Almond

Avenue of the Sphinxes

Avenue of the Sphinxes, Luxor, Egypt

An avenue of sandstone sphinxes stretches over 1.5 miles from the Temple of Luxor to the Temple of Karnak. At one time, over 1300 statues lined the road, which was used annually for the Opet Festival honoring the ancient Egyptian god Amun, his wife Mut, and their son Khonsu. The the sacred pathway was used as early as the 15th century BCE.  The pharaoh Nectenabo I (380-362 BCE) built the existing avenue and lined it with sphinxes bearing his name. Most of the sphinxes have human heads, but some earlier statues near Karnak have rams heads. In 2004, the Egyptian government began a massive excavation and restoration project to restore the road and its sphinxes, many of which had deteriorated, been buried in the sand, or used for other projects by the Romans and others.  Large sections of the avenue linking the two temples have been completed.

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