Black and White in Color

Heavenly Geometry

Dome over future tomb of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark, Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark

The dome over the side chapel which holds the future tomb of Queen Margrethe II of Denmark in Roskilde Cathedral, Denmark. Roskilde Cathedral is the site of the Denmark’s royal burials. Domes have long been associated with burials and tombs. They are said to be a reflection of the heavens and the cosmos.

Join Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Any Geometric Shape

Time Squared: #14

Feeding Time

Feeding Time, Den Gamle By, Aarhus, Denmark

Join Becky’s 30 day December Square Challenge. It’s simple. Photos must be square and must be related to time, literally or figuratively. Day 14

Tranquil Tones

Warmed By The Sun

Tranquil Yellow Kitchen, Den Gamle By, Aarhus, Denmark

Join Frank’s Tuesday Photo Challenge: Tranquil

Tools

Tools of the Trade

Shoemaker’s Shop , Den Gamble By (Old Town), Aarhus, Denmark

 

Join Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Tools

Outstanding Standing Out

For King Erik the Mad

Costume from Erik XIV, 1974, designed by Lars Juhl, hand woven by Else Duch, The Theater Museum at the Court Theater, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark

The King’s costume from Erik XIV by August Strindberg. The 1974 Kaspar Rostrup production was staged at The Royal Theater in Copenhagen, with costumes designed by Lars Juhl and hand woven by Else Duch. Several of the costumes are currently displayed on the stage of The Theater Museum at the Court Theater, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Eric XIV was King of Sweden from 1560 until he was deposed in 1568. Early in his reign he showed signs of mental instability and eventually became insane. After being deposed, he was imprisoned and possibly murdered. A  1959 examination of his remains showed he may have died of arsenic poisoning.

Join Lens-Artist’s Photo Challenge 18: Blending In or Standing Out

Living in Orange Houses

Oozing Charm

Møllestien, Street of Charming, Painted Houses, Aarhus, Denmark

Møllestien (the mill lane) is an ancient street in the center of Aarhus, with origins dating back to the time of the Vikings.  Today’s Møllestien, with its small houses and cobblestone pavement, showcases 19th-century working class housing. It is regarded by many as the most beautiful street in Aarhus.  The area suffered a serious decline beginning in the 1920s, and by 1960 had become abandoned and derelict.  Plans to demolish the entire area were revised when artists and students renovated a short section of the street and painted the houses vibrant colors. Most of the existing houses were built between 1870 and 1885. Several of the houses can be rented by the night. Møllestien is in all the guidebooks. I found it a bit difficult to locate.

 

Join Terri’s Sunday Stills: Orange You Glad and Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Places People Live

%d bloggers like this: