Peace and Quiet

Sail Away

Sunset on the Nile, Luxor, Egypt

One of the things that surprised me most in Egypt was how quiet the Nile River is. Few if any motors or engines, puffed sails, and the countryside passing by while sailing. This shot was taken from my balcony of our small cruise ship while we were docked at Luxor. When I need to go to a calm place, I think about the river.

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Color Your World Almond

Avenue of the Sphinxes

Avenue of the Sphinxes, Luxor, Egypt

An avenue of sandstone sphinxes stretches over 1.5 miles from the Temple of Luxor to the Temple of Karnak. At one time, over 1300 statues lined the road, which was used annually for the Opet Festival honoring the ancient Egyptian god Amun, his wife Mut, and their son Khonsu. The the sacred pathway was used as early as the 15th century BCE.  The pharaoh Nectenabo I (380-362 BCE) built the existing avenue and lined it with sphinxes bearing his name. Most of the sphinxes have human heads, but some earlier statues near Karnak have rams heads. In 2004, the Egyptian government began a massive excavation and restoration project to restore the road and its sphinxes, many of which had deteriorated, been buried in the sand, or used for other projects by the Romans and others.  Large sections of the avenue linking the two temples have been completed.

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Written On Stone

Lighting Isis

Relief Carving, Temple of Isis, fromthe Island of Philae, now on Agilkia Island, Aswan, Egypt

The Temple of Isis is one of the structures in the original Temple of Philae. Submerged after the construction of the first Aswan dam in 1902, the Temple of Philae was salvaged in the 1970s, following completion of the Aswan High Dam. The temple compound was drained, dismantled and reconstructed on a new island (Agilkia) in a reservoir of the Aswan low dam. While not on Lake Nasser, Philae is considered a major success as part of the rescue of Nubian monuments and sites. Philae was said to have been one of Egypt’s most beautiful temples. It drew visitors well into the 20th century, even after parts were flooded. Unfortunately, submersion in water and river silt has removed the painted surfaces.

The relief carvings of gods/godesses and pharaohs were deface during the period Philae was converted to a Christian church.

Join K’lee & Dale’s Cosmic Photo Challenge: Written in Stone – Stone Works and Structures Old and New

Karnak The Magnificent

Larger Than Life

The great hypostyle hall, Karnak Temple, El-Karnak, Luxor Governorate, Egypt

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Very Subtle Selfie

Can You See Me Now?

Store Window, Old Cairo, Egypt

I blend in quite well among the vintage Egyptian wares in a store front in Old Cairo. This challenge was a good use of a bad photo.

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One Word Sunday: Giant

Rescued Giants

Temple of Nefertari, Abu Simbel, Egypt

The Temple of Nefertari is one of two massive 13th-century BCE rock-cut temples at Abu Simbel, a village in Nubia, part of southern Egypt. They are dedicated to Pharaoh Ramses II  and his favorite wife, Nefertari, whose giant relief  images decorate the of the temple, and commemorate the Pharoah’s victory at the Battle of Kadesh. Neferatri wasn’t granted equal status on the temple dedicated to Ramses II, who had an inflated ego based upon the number of representations of himself he commissioned.

Abu Simbel is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site known as the “Nubian Monuments.”  Between 1960 and 1980, through the use of international campaign, 19 temples or monuments were rescued from the rising waters of Lake Nasser after construction of the Aswan High Dam on the Nile River. The monuments were dismantled, carved up and moved to other sites. Fifteen were reassembled in six groups along the shores of the lake; Egypt donated four temples to countries whose efforts had greatly contributed to the success of the salvage and rescue operation. Between 1964 and 1968, Abu Simbel was cut into blocks, dismantled and relocated to a location 65 meters higher than its original location on the western bank of the Nile River.

Join Debbie at Travel With Intent for her One Word Sunday Photo Challenge: Giant

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