Marvelous Architecture

Rooftop Warriors

Ventilation Shafts, Casa Milà ( La Pedrera), Antonio Gaudi, 1906-1912, Barcelona, Spain

Join K’lee & Dale’s Cosmic Photo Challenge: Architectural Marvels

Delicate Elements

Patio of the Dolls

 

Patio of the maidens

Delicately carved plasterwork covers many of the architectural elements of the Real Alcázar of Seville (Reales Alcázares de Sevilla). The core of the Alcázar palace was built in the 1340s for the Christian king Peter of Castile and expanded by subsequent monarchies. A preeminent example of Mudéjar architecture, sections of the palace were built by Moorish (Mudéjar) craftsmen who remained on the Iberian Peninsula after the Christian Reconquest. It is the oldest royal palace still in use in Europe. In 1987, it was registered as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO.

The three photos highlight the plasterwork decorative motifs in the Patio of the Dolls and the Patio of the Maidens. For information on Nasrid plasterwork, read Nasrid plasterwork: symbolism, materials & techniques.

From Wikipedia: “In architecture Mudéjar style does not refer to a distinct architectural style but to the application of traditional Islamic ornamental and decorative elements to Christian Romanesque, Gothic, and Renaissance architectural styles, mostly taking place in Spain in the 13th, 14th and 15th centuries, although it continued to appear in Spanish architecture well after this period. It also appeared in the architecture of other countries and regions, most notably Portugal, and later in the Spanish colonies in the Americas in the 16th and 17th centuries.”

Join Lens-Artists Weekly Photo Challenge #46: Delicate

Circular in La Serenissima

La Finestra Circolare

Window with screen, Venice, Italy

  • I like this small, circular window in the Sant’Elena area of Venice, Italy. I have been playing with the new texture slider in Lightroom.

Join Nancy’s A Photo A Week: Circles and Squares

Peace and Quiet

Sail Away

Sunset on the Nile, Luxor, Egypt

One of the things that surprised me most in Egypt was how quiet the Nile River is. Few if any motors or engines, puffed sails, and the countryside passing by while sailing. This shot was taken from my balcony of our small cruise ship while we were docked at Luxor. When I need to go to a calm place, I think about the river.

Join Weekly Prompt’s Photo Challenge: Peaceful

Raindrops

Thirsty

Thirsty

 

Join Nancy’s A Photo A Week Challenge: Raindrops

Plangent Plucking

Electric Bass

Electric Bass

From Merriam-Webster:  Plangent adds power to our poetry and prose: the pounding of waves, the beat of wings, the tolling of a bell, the throbbing of the human heart, a lover’s knocking at the door – all have been described as plangent. The word plangent traces back to the Latin verb plangere, which has two meanings. The first of those meanings, “to strike or beat,” was sometimes used by Latin speakers in reference to striking one’s breast in grief. This, in turn, led to the verb’s second meaning: “to lament.” The sense division carried over to the Latin adjective plangens and then into English, giving us the two distinct meanings of “plangent”: “pounding” and “expressive of melancholy.”

Join Ragtag Daily Prompt-Monday:Plangent

%d bloggers like this: