Lines Squared #8

Structural Lines

Upper Street Level, Ground Floor, Palazzo Medici e Ricardi, Florence, Italy

Join Becky from The Life of B for October Squares: Lines and Squares #8. There are only two rules. The image must be square and must relate to the October theme: lines&squares.

Lines Squared #7

Facade Lines

Il Duomo, exterior wall, Firenze, Italia.

The Cathedral in Florence was built between 1296 and 1436. The polychrome marble facade was added to the masonary Gothic structure between 1876-1887.

Join Becky from The Life of B for October Squares: Lines and Squares #7. There are only two rules. The image must be square and must relate to the October theme: lines&squares.

Black & White in Color

Silver Fish on a Silver Dish

Detail, Dish Cover, Antoine- Sebastian Durand, (master in 1740), Paris c. 1745-1755, Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon, Portugal

 

Join Cee’s Black & White Challenge: Made by Humans

Pink It Is #14

Lady of Loreto Pink

Ceiling decoration,18th-century, Our Lady of Loreto, Lisbon, Portugal

Details from an 18th-century ceiling panel in the Church of Our Lady of Loreto in Lisbon, Portugal. Also called the Church of the Italians , Our Lady of Loreto is in the Chiado district.

Join BeckyB’s Square in September: In the Pink. Photos must be square, and for September, have to contain something pink. See this link for more information on how to take part in BeckyB’s quarterly square challenge..

Backroads America

In the US, cemeteries are often the oldest existing remnants of European settlers. In the Husdson Valley, which luckily has preserved much of its heritage, many small towns maintain their historic cemeteries. This headstone is from 1785, in the town of Canaan. RIP Esther Million.

One Word Sunday: Circle

Circles

Ceiling Decoration, Queen’s Boudoir, Palace of Queluz (Palácio de Queluz),

Ceiling decoration from the Queen’s Boudoir in the Palace of Queluz (Palácio de Queluz), an 18th-century Portuguese rococo palace, located at Queluz, now a suburb of Lisbon. Construction began in 1747 as a summer retreat for Dom Pedro of Braganza. He later married  his niece, Maria  (December 1734–March 1816). In 1777, Maria became Dona Maria I, Queen of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves; Dom Pedro became king consort. The early years of Maria’s reign were successful, but following Dom Pedro’s death in 1786, she grew increasingly unstable, suffering from religious mania and melancholia. Her mental illness made her incapable of handling state affairs after 1792. In 1794, Queen Maria and her court took up official residence at Queluz, where she could be shielded from the public. Queluz Palace remained the official residence of the Portuguese prince regent John V, Maria’s eldest son, and the royal family although he ruled from Lisbon and the palace at Mafra. In 1807 the royal family, including Maria, fled to the Portuguese colony of Brazil following the French invasion of Portugal. Maria died in Brazil in 1816; she was known as Maria the Pious (in Portugal), or Maria the Mad (in Brazil).

Join Debbie for One Word Sunday: Circle

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