Bridges

A Bridge to Nowhere

Pont Saint-Bénézet, also known as the Pont d’Avignon, Avignon, France

 

The Pont Saint-Bénézet, also known as the Pont d’Avignon, is a medieval bridge in Avignon, in southern France.  Originally a wooden bridge spanning the Rhone, the bridge was rebuilt in stone beginning in 1234. It had 22 stone arches when completed. The bridge was abandoned in the mid-17th century because the arches collapsed during floods. Today, only four arches and the gatehouse on the Avignon end of the bridge survive.

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Reflections

Mill Pond Reflections

Mill pond, Den Gamle By, Aarhus, Denmark

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Creative Reuse

Phone Books

Old phone booth now used as a street library, Sigtuna, Sweden

An old phone booth (telephone booth, telephone kiosk, telephone call box, telephone box or public call box) has been reused as a book kiosk in Sigtuna, Sweden.

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Gilded Thrones

Royal Gold

Throne Room, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark

The Throne Room in Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark. The thrones, reminders of the period of Denmark’s absolute monarchy (1660 to 1848), are no longer used. The king’s throne, on the left, is adorned with two golden lions; the queen’s throne, on the right, features two mythical creatures called griffons. The oval room is now used for greeting dignitaries during state visits. Christiansborg Palace has burned twice, in 1794 and 1884. The current palace was built between 1907 and 1928. The thrones were rescued from the 1884 fire.

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Royal Details

Fleur-de-lis

Detail of gate into the Tuileries Garden (Jardin des Tuileries), near the the Place de la Concorde, Paris, France

Looking into the Tuileries Garden (Jardin des Tuileries) from a gate near the the Place de la Concorde, Paris, France. The fleur-de-lis (lily) was used for centuries to represent French royalty. Regarded as a sign of purity since antiquity. the Roman Catholic Church adopted the lily  to represent Virgin Mary. Legend has it that when Pope Leo III crowned Charlemagne emperor in 800, he presented Charlemagne with a blue banner covered with golden fleurs-de-lis.

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Venice Street Lights At Dawn

I bei lampioni di Venezia all’alba

Street lamps, Riva Degli Schiavoni, Venice,Italy

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