Il Duomo, a Medieval Masterpiece in Siena, Italy

Past Favorite

Arches, the Mosque at Cordoba, Spain

Join Becky’s Square Challenge for October: PastSquares

Shining Light on the Past

Gothic elements in the Church of St. John the Baptist, Matera, Basilicata, c. 1229.

Join Becky’s October Square Challenge; PastSquares.

Square Perspective #31

Arches

Arches, the Mosque at Cordoba, Spain

The Mosque–Cathedral of Córdoba (also known as the Great Mosque of Córdoba or the Mezquita) in Córdoba, Spain is one of the greatest achievements in Moorish architecture. Construction of the mosque began in the 8th century after the Islāmic conquest of al-Andalus.. Begun by Abd al-Rahman I in A.D. 785 and expanded three times by his successors in the Umayyad dynasty, the mosque could hold 40,000 people. Córdoba became the capital of the Umayyad caliphate. With the caliphate came the artistic and architectural style elements of Syria and Byzantium, which mixed with existing design and building elements to become what is known as the Moorish style. The use of horseshoe, multifoil, and other arches in mosques in Spain helped spread Islāmic design throughout Europe. Arches served structural and functional purposes but became more decorative in Moorish design. The Mezquita combined Moorish and European elements. The innovative double arch arcade, with horseshoe arches supporting semi-circular arches, permitted a higher ceiling in the hypostyle prayer hall.

Join Becky’s July Square Perspective #31.

Only one rule, the image must be square. Thank you Becky for hosting this wonderful challenge. I can’t wait to see what you come up with for October.

 

Arches and Domes

Its All in the Crop

Transept Crossing Dome, Basilica of San Lorenzo, c. Florence, Italy. Building dates from the Renaissance, 15th century.. Frescoed ceiling painted by Vincenzo Meucci in 1742.

Join Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Half Circles, Arches and Domes (Creative Cropping)

CFFC: Arch, Dome or Half-Circle

Acoustic Arches

Porta da Vila, the main gate of Obidos, Portugal

The interior passage of the Porta da Vila, the main gate into the Portuguese walled city of Obidos. The chapel on the balcony is decorated with blue and white 18th century (1740-1740) glazed tiles, called azulejo. The tiles depict the Passion of Christ and the painted ceiling represents the crown of thorns.

Join Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Arch, Dome or Half-Circle

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