Four Doors Down

Abandoned

Four consecutive doors in a mostly abandoned residential street in Aveiro, Portugal. House numbers 38, 40, 42, and for some reason, 34a.

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Inside

Outside Inside

Decaying building, Aveiro Portugal

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Pink It Is #20

Moliceiro, Aveiro, Portugal

Flamingo Pink

 

Join BeckyB’s Square in September: In the Pink. Photos must be square, and for September, have to contain something pink. See this link for more information on how to take part in BeckyB’s quarterly square challenge..

Pink It Is

Portuguese Pink

Art Nouveau facade, former Cooperativa Agrícola, 1913 Aveiro, Portugal

Aveiro’s Art Nouveau movement in the early 20th century adopted and adapted the Portuguese use and production of tiles, decorating them with sinuous floral  and plant-inspired motifs and other natural elements. Facade decorations using tiles, wrought iron, and stonework were often the only Art Nouveau elements used. Aveiro’s Art Nouveau buildings were mainly residential,  The ornate facades were all about showing of economic wealth and influence of the owners, many of whom were returning emigres from Brazil. Construction and interior decoration generally followed more traditional, conservative design. Located along the Rossio waterfront in Aveiro, the façade of the former Cooperativa Agrícola is embellished with hand-painted tiles representing lilies set against a pink background. The  hand-painted tiles were produced  locally in the Fonte Nova Factory in 1913 and are attributed to Licínio Pinto, a celebrated local artist.

Join BeckyB’s Square in September: In the Pink. Photos must be square, and for September, have to contain something pink. See this link for more information on how to take part in BeckyB’s quarterly square challenge..

A Photo A Week: Quintessential

Decorating Portugal

Glazed tiles (Azulejos), Sintra, Portugal

Azulejos, tin-glazed ceramic tiles, were introduced to present-day Spain and Portugal by the invading Moors as early as the 13th century. During the 16th and 17th centuries, their use in Portuguese art and architecture became common. Earlier geometric patterns were replaced with elaborate decorative scenes and ornate elements. Azulejos were used to tell stories, especially in churches (where large blank walls in earlier Gothic buildings were covered with elaborate panels), palaces, schools, and other public building. Today Azulejos are still used in Portuguese architecture on both the interior and exterior of building. Efforts are being made to protect historic Azulejos. Beginning in 2013, Lisbon made it illegal to demolish buildings with tile covered facades. Lisbon’s Banco do Azulejo  stores over 30,000 tiles from demolished or renovated buildings. Aviero, Porto and Ovar have similar programs. Since August 2017, a national law prevents the demolition or renovation of buildings that would mean the removal of tiles.

 

Walls of the 14th century cloister of Porto’s cathedral were covered with tiles in the 18th century. While many scenes are religious, they also include scenes from the Metamorphoses, an epic poem by the Roman writer Ovid.

Exotic subjects or elements often depicted in scenes from Portugal’s global empire. This 18th century panel is in the National Palace of Queluz.

A house in Aveiro, Portugal.

For more pictures and information see my earlier posts on Obidos , Aveiro, and Lisbon.

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Window with Bricks and Bush

Vacant building, backstreets of Aveiro, Portugal

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