Oh My! Look Up!

Heavens to Sophie Amalie

Ceiling Panel by Abraham Wucherts, mid-17th century,Christian IV’s Bedroom, Rosenborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark

Three ceiling paintings in “Christian IV’s Bedroom” in Rosenborg Palace depict the gods of earth, the heavens and the oceans. The center panel shows Hera, Queen of the Gods, and and her husband Zeus on Mount Olympus.  The nude figure of Hera is said to resemble Queen Sophie Amalie,  wife of Frederik III, King of Denmark-Norway. Frederick (ruled 1648-1670) and Sophie Amalie used the bedroom after his father, Christian IV, died in 1648. Tradition says that Sophie Amalie, a beautiful and power hungry queen, actually posed for the painting. The painting was added to the Baroque stucco ceiling, which was installed in the 1630’s under Christian IV, in the mid-17th century. Abraham Wuchters, a Dutch painter in the Danish court, painted the central panel.

Join Lens-Artist Photo Challenge #13: Look Up.  For more information on how to join the Lens-Artists Photo Challenges, click here.

CB&WC: Fountains

Let There Be Water

Detail for one of two identical Baroque fountains in Rossio Square  (Pedro IV Square) in Lisbon, Portugal. I blinked and the water started to flow.

Join Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Fountains

A Photo A Week: A Study in Light

Sky Lights

Dome, Basilica da Estrela, Lisbon, Portugal

 

The Estrela Basilica (Basílica da Estrela) or the Convent of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, sits on one of Lisbon’s seven hills.  Queen Maria I of Portugal ordered construction of the church to fulfilled a promise after giving birth to a healthy son (José, Prince of Brazil). Unfortunately, Jose died of smallpox before construction was completed in 1790. Surfaces are covered with green, pink and yellow marble.

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CFFC: Arch, Dome or Half-Circle

Acoustic Arches

Porta da Vila, the main gate of Obidos, Portugal

The interior passage of the Porta da Vila, the main gate into the Portuguese walled city of Obidos. The chapel on the balcony is decorated with blue and white 18th century (1740-1740) glazed tiles, called azulejo. The tiles depict the Passion of Christ and the painted ceiling represents the crown of thorns.

Join Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Arch, Dome or Half-Circle

Thursday’s Special: Traces of the Past

It’s All In The Details

Architectural detail, Organ, 1737, Saint Michael’s Chapel, University of Coimbra, Portugal

Architectural detail, Chapel, University of Coimbra, Portugal

Details of the 18th century Baroque organ in Saint Michael’s Chapel at the University of Coimbra, in Coimbra, Portugal. Note the  Chinese  (chinoiserie)  motifs  between the floral moldings.  Painter Gabriel Ferreira da Cunha decorated the organ in 1737.  It has about 2,000 pipes and still works. The Chapel itself was designed in the 16th century as a royal chapel, before the palace became a university.

Join Paula’s Thursday’s Special: Traces of the Past – Y4-05

Convent of Saint Peter of Alcantara, Lisbon

Built in 1681, the small church of the Convent of Saint Peter of Alcantara and the adjacent Chapel of the Lencastres are a small gem.

The convent, in the Bairro Alto neighborhood, sits across from Miradouro Sao Pedro de Alcantara park, one of Lisbon’s top viewpoints. It is close to the Elvador da Gloria, a funicular which connects with the city center.

Baroque azulejo (glazed tile) panels lining the nave walls tell the life story of St. Peter of Alcantar. Ornate flourishes, architectural elements, and putti (with heads at odd angles) frame the story panels. The tromp d’oeil ceiling painting gives the effect of delicate moulding.

The adjacent inlaid marble chapel is dedicated to Verissimo de Lencastre, Cardinal and Grand Inquisitor, who supported foundation of the convent.

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