Outstanding Standing Out

For King Erik the Mad

Costume from Erik XIV, 1974, designed by Lars Juhl, hand woven by Else Duch, The Theater Museum at the Court Theater, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark

The King’s costume from Erik XIV by August Strindberg. The 1974 Kaspar Rostrup production was staged at The Royal Theater in Copenhagen, with costumes designed by Lars Juhl and hand woven by Else Duch. Several of the costumes are currently displayed on the stage of The Theater Museum at the Court Theater, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark.

Eric XIV was King of Sweden from 1560 until he was deposed in 1568. Early in his reign he showed signs of mental instability and eventually became insane. After being deposed, he was imprisoned and possibly murdered. A  1959 examination of his remains showed he may have died of arsenic poisoning.

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Imitations of Flight

View From Below

Storks, ceiling painting, Johannes Larsen, Queen’s Reference Library, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark

Johannes Larsen (1867 – 1961) was a Danish nature painter noted for his images of birds. This ceiling painting in the Queen’s Reference Library at Christiansborg Palace is one of several he painted in public buildings.

 

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Gilded Thrones

Royal Gold

Throne Room, Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark

The Throne Room in Christiansborg Palace, Copenhagen, Denmark. The thrones, reminders of the period of Denmark’s absolute monarchy (1660 to 1848), are no longer used. The king’s throne, on the left, is adorned with two golden lions; the queen’s throne, on the right, features two mythical creatures called griffons. The oval room is now used for greeting dignitaries during state visits. Christiansborg Palace has burned twice, in 1794 and 1884. The current palace was built between 1907 and 1928. The thrones were rescued from the 1884 fire.

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Royal Reception Rooms in Christiansborg Palace

The royal family do not live in Christiansborg palace. It is used for state occasions and houses the parliament, supreme court, and prime minister. The palace has burned twice. The current palace, completed in 1928, is the Queen’s working palace. The royal apartments were never occupied and were turned over to the government.

The Queen’s Reference Library

The Abildgaard Room

The Velvet Room

The Green Room

The Great Hall and the new tapestries showing the history of Denmark. Hung in 2000.

The Queen/Current Day

The Throne Room

The Tower Room

Queen Margrethe II, 2010

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