Time Squared: #6, 7, and 8

Time of the Season

Did you realize there is no Falltime?

Wintertime

Alaska Morning

Springtime

Istanbul April

Summertime

Minnesota Summertime

Fall

Frankfurt Fall

Join Becky’s 30 day December Square Challenge. It’s simple. Photos must be square and must be related to time, literally or figuratively. Days 6,7,8

Prairie Moonrise at Sunset

Dusk fell soon after the train departed Chicago. The gray skies cleared as the moon rose. Amazing what a smart phone can do through a dirty train window in low light. With a little help from Snapseed

Backroads America: Submerged

Returned to the Wild

Section of the C&O Canal in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, along Berm Road, near Hancock, Maryland

Trees growing in the historic Chesapeake and Ohio (C&O) Canal in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, along Berm Road, near Hancock, Maryland. By design, the 19th-century canal ran parallel to the Potomac River in the states of Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. The 185 mile canal moved coal, lumber, and agricultural products down from Cumberland, Maryland to markets in Georgetown, Virginia. Built between 1828 and 1850, plans originally called for the canal to connect to the Ohio River; exorbitant costs and construction issue resulted in the canal terminating in Cumberland. Goods began moving down the lower section of the canal in 1831. But even as canal construction continued, the newly expanding railroad system brought competition to the waterway. The canal’s best years in the early 1870s were followed by an economic depression and several devastating floods. After another flood in 1924, canal operations ceased and no further repairs undertaken. By then, the railroad had captured most of the regions trade.

In a way, though, the railroads  are responsible for the preservation of  the historic and natural features of the canal. In 1889, a flood forced the canal company into receivership, and the B&O Railroad bought the majority of the canal’s bonds. In 1938 the railroad sold the entire canal to the U.S. Government for $2 million, and it was placed under the supervision of the National Park Service. In 1961 President Eisenhower designated it a national monument, and  in 1971 Congress authorized the C & O Canal a National Historical Park. Check out the Park’s website for information  walking and biking trails, information centers, and other activities in the park.  The Western Maryland Rail Trail runs along the canal in this area.

Join Paula’s THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: PICK A WORD IN AUGUST – Y3

Goodbye WPC: You’ll Miss Us When You’re Gone

All-Time Favorites

 

It’s sad to see the end of the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge. It was a great community, and I found some great blogs to follow every week.

WPC: All-Time Favorites

A Porto in Every Storm

The drive from the city of Porto to the Douro River Valley, the home of the liquid porto, winds through hills and valleys covered with vines. Vines going up, down, over, and around the hills.

As we came down into the valley, we stopped to view the small city of Pinhão in the distance. Pinhão, in the Alto Douro, is the start of the porto region. The micro climate is perfect for grapes, olives, and almonds.

The Douro Valley is famous for its wine production, especially port, or porto as its called here. Porto is a fortified wine with a high alcohol content, about 20%. Porto can be ruby, tawny, white, and vintage. Some are a blend of several varieties.

Much of the valley is slate, which makes an excellent soil for vines. It also makes great walls and stone terraces.

The Douro Valley is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. It was the first demarcated wine region in the world.

We visited Quinta do Seixo, the winery where Sandeman products originate. Sandeman was established in 1790 and was family owned until 1993.

Sandeman was the first company to register a trademark, in 1877, and to export bottled and labeled product. It is famous for its advertising image, The Don.

Sandeman still grows and harvests its grapes by hand. Manual crushing has been replaced, however, by metal paddles engineered to replicate the pressure and action of feet. They “stomp” in a series if granite tanks, which drain into metal holding tanks.

The tanks are empty at the moment. The porto is transferred to Porto for aging. They are experimenting with aging on site, in an area with the required temperature and other requirements.

Our tour ended with a lovely lunch, including a rose wine made by the company.

As we were leaving, we passed some of the new vines.

The Douro River Valley is beautiful. I need to come back. Maybe a cruise up the river to visit the charming towns along the banks.

P.S. I wasn’t a big porto fan but I discovered white porto at dinner this evening.

Elemental

Earth And Sky

Sunset, Columbia County, New York

 

Pond Reflections, Olana Farm, home of painter Frederic Edwin Church, in the Hudson Valley, New York

Water Signs

 

 

Sunset, Valetia, New York

Fire in the Air

Join WPC: Elemental

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