The Eyes Have It

Those Lion Eyes

Two male lions and one lioness in Serengeti National Park in Tanzania.

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Pick A Word In April: All About Lions

The Lions of the Masai Mara

Resplendent

Male lion resting inn the shade, Masi Mara National Park, Kenya

Alluring

Pride of lionesses resting in shade of bushes, Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

Plagued

Tow lionesses plagued by flies, Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

Copycats

Lionesses resting in Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

Timeworn

Aging Lioness missing one eye, Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

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Kopjes

Catching Some Rays in the Serengeti

Lions sunning on top of a large rock, Serengeti National Park, Tanzania

As we were driving across the Serengeti, we began to see huge boulders and isolated stacks of rocks jutting from the plains. They were a stark contrast to the endless grass covered plains. The granite and gneiss outcroppings in the western Serengeti are called kopjes. They are over 550 million years old; the surrounding rock/soil through which they protrude is over 1200 million years old. The ancient stacked rocks are the result of volcanic activity. Serengeti soil is composed of volcanic rock and ash covering an older layer of metamorphic rock. The softer rocks and ash eroded, revealing the granite kopjes. The rock formations are an important part of the Serengeti’s ecosystem. They provide habitat for a plants, animals, insects, birds and reptiles. Lions often use the kopjes as vantage points to look for game and predators and as lounging areas. The kopjes pictured here is one of the simpler formations we saw.

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Four Lions and a Bird’s Nest

Farewell Serengeti. You saved one of the best for last. There are four lions and a weaver’s best in this tree. Can you find them all?

Serengeti Cats

The Serengeti is amazing. Animals everywhere. Lots of cats today.

Up close and personal with mama Cheetah.

Two brother lions in the shade.

A pride of lions resting on top of a rock.

We watched a pride of lions stalk and kill a wildebeest. A pride member stands in the background.

K’lee and Dale’s Cosmic Challenge: Five Ways To Friday

Swahili – Ijummaa

Watering Hole, Etosha National Park, Namibia

Watering Hole, Etosha National Park, Namibia

Friday at the watering hole, Etosha National Park, Namibia. A pride of lions gathers to relax and drink at a watering hole. Swahili is not spoken in Namibia but the same scene could be witnesses in many of the parks in Zambia and Tanzania. English is the official language of Namibia, but there are at least five ways to say Friday:  Friday (English); Vryday (Afrikaans); Freitag (German); Etitano (Ndango/Owambo); and Oritjatano ( Herero).


From Travel Namibia:  The new constitution drawn up at the time of Namibian independence designated English as the official language, even though it was the native tongue of only about two per cent of the population. It was decided that with English, all ethnic groups would be at equal disadvantage. If you want to make friends it pays to know just a few words in the local lingo. Saying ‘hello’ is always a good start….
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• Afrikaans (the most common lingua franca): Hallo

• Damara/Nama (! denotes a tongue click in this difficult language): !Gai tses

• German (widely spoken): Guten Tag

• Herero/Himba (useful in North Central Namibia): Tjike

• !kung San (more tongue clicking in Northern Namibia): !Kao

• Lozi/Rosti (widely spoken in Caprivi): Eeni, sha

• Owambo (The most common first language): Wa lalapo (morning) Wa tokelwapo (evening)

K’lee and Dale’s Cosmic Challenge: Friday Around the World

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