Basilica of Santa Croce: The Facade with Clouds

Construction of the Basilica began in 1294. It is the 3rd largest church in the world.

The ornate polychrome marble facade, like that of Florence’s more famous Duomo, was actually added in the 19th century.

Prior to the new facade, the front of the Basilica would have looked like the adjacent cloister and tower. The rest of the building remains the reddish limestone. The Duomo, on the other hand, was totally sheathed in marble.

The Italian architect Niccolo Matas from Ancona designed the Neo-Gothic facade between 1857-1863.

Because Matas was Jewish, he could not be buried in Santa Croce. The Basilica is the burial place of many prominent Italian artists, writers, and thinkers and is called the Temple of Italian Glories. After Matas’ death, his body was moved and reburied under the porch of the Basilica.

But Matas left his mark on Santa Croce. He worked a prominent Star of David into the design. While both Jewish and Christian symbol, it’s prominence is meaningful

He is buried beneath his star, just outside the center door.

Il Duomo, a Medieval Masterpiece in Siena, Italy

Lines in Design

Horizontal Lines

The Baptistry, Florence, Italy

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In Memoriam

Winged Journey

Angel of Resurrection, Tomb Sculpture, 1859-1864, for tomb of Danish Contesse Berte Ferrari-Corbelli (born Moltke-Huitfeldt Af Bregentved), wife of Luigi Ferrari-Corbelli, by Giovanni Dupré (1 March 1817 – 10 January 1882),  left transept of Basilica of San Lorenzo, Florence, Italy

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Neptune

The Sea God

Fountain of Neptune, Florence, Italy

The marble statue of Neptune is the centerpiece of the Fountain of Neptune in the Piazza della Signoria, Florence, Italy. The figure was completed in 1565, by sculptor Bartolomeo Ammannati. Commissioned by Cosimo I de’ Medici, the fountain symbolizes Florence’s command of the Mediterranean Sea. The statue of Neptune is a 19th century copy; the original is in the National Museum. The other marble and bronze elements of the fountain were not finished in 1574.

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Last Day in Florence

I ended my four weeks in Florence with a visit to the most famous statue in the world, Michelangelo’s David. The Carrara marble statue weighs over five tons. (1501-1504) The photo has a slight red cast I couldn’t get rid of,

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