Arrivederci, Roma

The Pope’s Throne in the apse of the Archbasilica of Saint John Lateran.

My last stop on my five weeks in Italy. The Archbasilica of St. John Lateran is the Cathedral of Rome, the seat of the Pope as the Bishop of Rome. The basilica, on the site of the oldest church in Rome, was rebuilt or redesigned a number of times. Sections of the apse mosaic date to the 4th-6th centuries. The mosaic stonework on the walls and floor is medieval.

Santa Maria in Trastevere

One of the oldest churches in Rome, Santa Maria in Trastevere is one of the most beautiful. It is a minor basilica. Although there has been religious activity on the site since the 2nd century, the existing structure dates to the 12th century. The columns in the nave were repurposed from old Roman buildings.

The upper mosaics in the apse date to the mid-12th century and illustrate the glorification of the Virgin. The lower panels, depicting the life of the Virgin Mary, date to 1291.

The portico on the front of the church was added in 1702.

Color

20th Century Byzantine

Evening top, Gianni Versace, 1991/1992

Versace’s  autumn/winter collection was inspired by the Byzantine mosaics of the churches and religious buildings of Ravenna, Italy. The  halter top shown above was part of the 2018 Heavenly Bodies exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.  The photograph below shows a detail from a mosaic depicting the Empress Theodora from the 6th- century Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna.  Theodora (c. 500– 548) was empress of the Eastern Roman Empire, also called Byzantium or the Byzantine Empire, by her marriage to Emperor Justinian I.

Theodora (basilica San Vitale, Ravenna), By Petar Milošević –  Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=60461082

Join Ragtop’s Daily Prompt: Color 

Italica, the ruins of a Roman City in Spain

Founded in the 2nd century BC by Scipio, Italica was the first Roman settlement in Spain. It’s amphitheater, which seated 25,000, has served as a quarry for later structures, with little of its original marble surface still in place. Many of the pillars in the mosque in Cordoba came from Italica.

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