Heavenly Bodies

If you are going to be in New York City before October 9th, you must take the time to see Heavenly Bodies, an exhibit at two locations of the Metropolitain Museum of Art. Today I went to The Cloisters, part of the Met, to see what is actually the second part of the show. Medieval art and architecture are juxtaposed with 20th and 21st century haute couture fashion. Incredible. I can’t wait to see the rest tomorrow.

The Cloisters is a combination of architectural elements from European medieval churches and church related buildings, including four complete French cloisters. I don’t have a lot of information on each area.

Apse from a Spanish church. Wedding dress by Balenciaga. Wonderful lighting design.

By Viktor & Rolf, Dutch, 2018, original design 2000.

Thom Browne, wedding dress, in hall of unicorn tapestries. The Unicorn in Captivity, c. 1495.

John Galliano, House of Dior, 2006, inside staircase possibly belonging to King Francis I. Design relates to Machiavelli, whose writing were outlawed by the church.

Valentino, 2015 and The Annunciation triptych. Painting, workshop of Robert Campin, c.1427.

House of Dior, 2018, original design 1961, Marc Bohan. Wedding dress.

A few of my other favorites.

The last one is by Alexander McQueen, 1997/1998.

On a side note. I am so pleased with the quality of the photos from my new Samsung 9+. Only one of the photos has been edited

Color Your World 2018: 120 Days of Crayola – Maroon

Maroon In A Museum

 

 

Join Jennifer’s Color Your World 2018: 120 Days of Crayola, a 4 month (January 1, 2018 to April 30, 2018) blogging challenge event. Each day has a new color theme based on a past or current crayon color in Crayola’s box of 120 crayons.

Musee Lapidaire, Avignon

I left the sun behind in Aix with a short train journey to Avignon, the city of popes. I visited the Musee Lapidaire, which exhibits Greek, Roman, Etruscan, and Gaulish, sculpture, glassware, and ceramics. The museum, part of the Musee Calvert, is located in a 16th century Jesuit church. It is an excellent example of building reuse.

Fresh Falafel in Cairo

Second to last day of my Egypt trip. We have returned to Cairo. Before lunch that included fresh falafel, we visited the Egyptian Musuem.

The museum is so out of date it still uses fans for climate control and has very few labels identifying items.

Extraordinary works of are art plunked down in galleries  and no one stopping kids and adults from touching them.

They are building a new Egyption Museum in Giza. When finished, it will apparently be the biggest museum in the world. They have a long way to go because of delays. It was scheduled for 2018. This is a bad picture from a bus window.

Glow

Lumière Dorée

The Louvre, Glowing, Paris, France

WPC: Glow

Black & White Sunday: After and Before

Holy Light

 

Architectural detail from Santa María la Blanca in Toledo, Spain. Originally built as early as CE 180 as a synagogue, Saint Mary the White is now a museum owned and preserved by the Catholic Church. The use of Mudéjar (Moorish) architecture for a Jewish place of worship during the reign of King Alfonso VIII of Castile is seen by many as a symbol of the co-existence during the Middle Ages of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism in what is now Spain.  In 1405, the Jews were violently expelled from the synagogue, and it was used as a church, a monastery, and later, a sword workshop. The building, the third most visited historic site in Toledo, was declared a national memorial in 1856 and restored.  It is currently not used for religious purposes.

Join Paula’s Black & White Sunday: After and Before

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