Karnak and Luxor

The Same But Different

Columns, Temple at Karnak, Egypt

Karnak

Columns, Temple at Luxor, Egypt

Luxor

 

 

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Written On Stone

Lighting Isis

Relief Carving, Temple of Isis, fromthe Island of Philae, now on Agilkia Island, Aswan, Egypt

The Temple of Isis is one of the structures in the original Temple of Philae. Submerged after the construction of the first Aswan dam in 1902, the Temple of Philae was salvaged in the 1970s, following completion of the Aswan High Dam. The temple compound was drained, dismantled and reconstructed on a new island (Agilkia) in a reservoir of the Aswan low dam. While not on Lake Nasser, Philae is considered a major success as part of the rescue of Nubian monuments and sites. Philae was said to have been one of Egypt’s most beautiful temples. It drew visitors well into the 20th century, even after parts were flooded. Unfortunately, submersion in water and river silt has removed the painted surfaces.

The relief carvings of gods/godesses and pharaohs were deface during the period Philae was converted to a Christian church.

Join K’lee & Dale’s Cosmic Photo Challenge: Written in Stone – Stone Works and Structures Old and New

Color Your World 2018: 120 Days of Crayola – Outer Space

Outer Space Pharaoh

Ancient Egyptian King Mentuhotep II, who initiated the Middle Kingdom when he reunified upper and lower Egypt. He ruled from c. 2061–2010 BCE. Mentuhotep is said to be one of the first pharaohs deified while still living. The dark color of his skin and the crossed arms are references to Horus, the Egyptian god of death, fertility and resurrection.  The painted sandstone statue is in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, Egypt.

Join Jennifer’s Color Your World 2018: 120 Days of Crayola, a 4 month (January 1, 2018 to April 30, 2018) blogging challenge event. Each day has a new color theme based on a past or current crayon color in Crayola’s box of 120 crayons.

CFFC: Must have the Letter Q

Mortuary Temple of Queen Hatshepsut

 

Queen Hatshepsut was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of ancient Egypt. Born in 1507 BCE, she came to the throne in 1478 BCE on the death of her husband Thutmose II. She was in fact only acting as regent on behalf of her infant stepson Thutmose III. Within seven years, however, she took full power, assumed the title of pharaoh and became co-ruler.  To cement her authority as pharaoh, she ordered that she be depicted as a male in all likenesses, with the ruddy skin and false beard of male pharaohs. With the massive treasury  gained from expanded trade routes, she build vast monuments, including her mortuary temple complex at Deir el-Bahri, near the entrance of what became the Valley of the Kings. The statues on the third level of the temple show Hatshepsut in the guise of a male pharaoh. She governed for about 22 years and is the second historically confirmed female Egyptian pharaoh. After her death, Thutmose III and his son, Amenhotep II, erased her name from monuments and destroyed or defaced her images and statues. She is never mentioned by scribes in later records, and there is a gap in the list of kings for years she ruled. Hatshepsut disappeared into the detritus of history until after 1822, when hieroglyphics were deciphered following the discovery of the Rosetta stone  and scholars finally understand why a female name was combined with a male image.

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K’Lee & Dale’s Cosmic Photo Challenge: Skin

The Queen Who Would Be Pharaoh

Bust of Queen Hatshepsut, Eighteenth Dynasty, Egyptian Museum Cairo, Egypt

Hatshepsut was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of ancient Egypt. Born in 1507 BCE, she came to the throne in 1478 BCE on the death of her husband Thutmose II. She was in fact only acting as regent on behalf of her infant stepson Thutmose III. Within seven years, however, she took full power, assumed the title of pharaoh and became co-ruler. To cement her authority as pharaoh, she ordered that she be depicted as a male in all likenesses, with the ruddy skin and false beard of male pharaohs. For Egyptian artists, color had meaning and symbolism; use was consistent for over 3000 years. Males, including living pharaohs, were shown with reddish skin, to symbolize their outdoor life. Females had light yellow or whitish skin. Most deities had golden skin.

Hatshepsut’s reign was peaceful and prosperous, with expanded trade routes and commerce. She build vast monuments, including her mortuary temple complex at Deir el-Bahri, near the entrance of what became the Valley of the Kings. She governed for about 22 years and is the second historically confirmed female Egyptian pharaoh. After her death, Thutmose III and his son, Amenhotep II, erased her name from monuments and destroyed or defaced her images and statues. She is never mentioned by scribes in later records, and there is a gap in the list of kings for years she ruled. Hatshepsut disappeared into the detritus of history until after 1822, when hieroglyphics were deciphered following the discovery of the Rosetta stone. Hatshepsut was acknowledged as a great pharaoh when scholars finally understand why a female name was combined with a male image. This painted limestone bust, now in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, was found at her temple at Deir el-Bahri

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