Sacred Details: The Ceiling of the Clérigos Church

Look Toward the Heavens

 

 

 

The Clérigos Church in Porto, Portugal, was built for the Brotherhood of the Clérigos (Clergy) by Nicolau Nasoni, an Italian architect and painter who left an extensive body of work in the north of Portugal during the 18th century.

Construction of the church proper began in 1732 and was completed in 1750; the bell tower and the monumental divided stairway in front of the church were completed in 1763.  The Clérigos Church was one of the first baroque churches in Portugal to adopt a typical baroque elliptic floor plan, which is reflected in the ceiling and its decoration.

The coat of arms of the Brotherhood of the Clerics was created after the Fraternity of Our Lady of Mercy, St. Peter ad Vincula and St. Philip Neri joined to become what is now called the Brotherhood in 1707.The coat of arms combines the monogram of Mary (AM), the keys and the papal tiara of St. Peter, and the lily of St. Philip Néri.  See for further information.  http://www.torredosclerigos.pt/en/brotherhood-clerics/brotherhood-history

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Blue Squared

Porto Blue

Porto Blue, view from above.

A bit of Portugal for Becky.

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Stairway to Hogwarts

Author, Author

Store shelves with author clay portraits, Livaria Lello, Porto, Portugal

The upper shelves in Livraria Lello (Lello Bookstore) are adorned with miniature portrait busts of authors. Porto’s Livraria Lello is famous because J. K. Rowling used it as the inspiration for the library in the Harry Potter books. When she lived in Porto, she spent time in the store imagining the world of Hogwarts. Crowds line up to visit the bookstore, which has resulted in the store having to sell timed entry tickets and charging a fee. Too many people were crowding in just for photo opportunities and not buying anything. Even with the fee, it was packed the day I was there.  Getting to the upper level was difficult because people were posing and blocking the stairs. The entry fee is refundable if you buy a book or item not related to Harry Potter.

Underside of stairway leading to upper level of Livraria Lello, Porto, Portugal

Interior, Livraria Lello, Porto, Portugal

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Pink It Is #19

Petal Pink

Ice Plant in Bloom, near Porto, Portugal

 

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Floral Ambiance

High Altar Ambiance

High Altar, Trinidad Church (Iglesia de la Trinidad), Porto, Portugal

The high altar in Trinidad Church, Porto, Portugal, was decorated with vibrant flowers. Flowers were placed throughout the church on all the side altars and other spaces with surface areas. I don’t know it was a special occasion or religious holiday. It was at the end of May. If anyone knows the background on this use of flowers, please let me know. I was fascinated by the stepped structure behind the altar itself. I saw several altars with this type of stepped backdrop in Portugal but don’t know the symbolism.

Side altar, Trinidad Church, Porto, Portugal

 

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A Photo A Week: Quintessential

Decorating Portugal

Glazed tiles (Azulejos), Sintra, Portugal

Azulejos, tin-glazed ceramic tiles, were introduced to present-day Spain and Portugal by the invading Moors as early as the 13th century. During the 16th and 17th centuries, their use in Portuguese art and architecture became common. Earlier geometric patterns were replaced with elaborate decorative scenes and ornate elements. Azulejos were used to tell stories, especially in churches (where large blank walls in earlier Gothic buildings were covered with elaborate panels), palaces, schools, and other public building. Today Azulejos are still used in Portuguese architecture on both the interior and exterior of building. Efforts are being made to protect historic Azulejos. Beginning in 2013, Lisbon made it illegal to demolish buildings with tile covered facades. Lisbon’s Banco do Azulejo  stores over 30,000 tiles from demolished or renovated buildings. Aviero, Porto and Ovar have similar programs. Since August 2017, a national law prevents the demolition or renovation of buildings that would mean the removal of tiles.

 

Walls of the 14th century cloister of Porto’s cathedral were covered with tiles in the 18th century. While many scenes are religious, they also include scenes from the Metamorphoses, an epic poem by the Roman writer Ovid.

Exotic subjects or elements often depicted in scenes from Portugal’s global empire. This 18th century panel is in the National Palace of Queluz.

A house in Aveiro, Portugal.

For more pictures and information see my earlier posts on Obidos , Aveiro, and Lisbon.

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