Written On Stone

Lighting Isis

Relief Carving, Temple of Isis, fromthe Island of Philae, now on Agilkia Island, Aswan, Egypt

The Temple of Isis is one of the structures in the original Temple of Philae. Submerged after the construction of the first Aswan dam in 1902, the Temple of Philae was salvaged in the 1970s, following completion of the Aswan High Dam. The temple compound was drained, dismantled and reconstructed on a new island (Agilkia) in a reservoir of the Aswan low dam. While not on Lake Nasser, Philae is considered a major success as part of the rescue of Nubian monuments and sites. Philae was said to have been one of Egypt’s most beautiful temples. It drew visitors well into the 20th century, even after parts were flooded. Unfortunately, submersion in water and river silt has removed the painted surfaces.

The relief carvings of gods/godesses and pharaohs were deface during the period Philae was converted to a Christian church.

Join K’lee & Dale’s Cosmic Photo Challenge: Written in Stone – Stone Works and Structures Old and New

Color Your World 2018: 120 Days of Crayola – Sepia

Stone In Sepia

Relief Carving, Temple at Edfu, Egypt

Join Jennifer’s Color Your World 2018: 120 Days of Crayola, a 4 month (January 1, 2018 to April 30, 2018) blogging challenge event. Each day has a new color theme based on a past or current crayon color in Crayola’s box of 120 crayons.

CB&WC: Walls

Gods, Pharaohs, and Hieroglyphs

Intersecting walls at Edfu Temple, Edfu, Egypt

King Ptolemy VIII making an offering to the Goddess Hathor and the God Horus. Relief carving on the wall of the ambulatory surrounding the sanctuary of the Temple of Edfu. Construction of the temple began in 237 BCE and continued until about 57 BCE.  The architecture combines traditional Egyptian elements with Greek influences. It is dedicated to the cult of a triad of Gods: Horus of Behdet, his wife Hathor and their son, Hor-Sama-Tawy.

Join Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Walls

Thursday’s Special: Angular

Angles at Edfu

Inner walls at Edfu Temple, Egypt

The Temple of Edfu, located on the west bank of the Nile, is dedicated to the falcon god Horus. The  sandstone temple complex was built in the Ptolemaic period between 237 and 57 BC. It is the second largest temple after Karnak and is the most completely preserved ancient temple in Egypt. Prior to excavations which began in the 1860s, the temple was buried under almost 40 ft of desert sand and Nile river silt. The chisel marks on the relief figures were  done during the period the temple was used as a christian church.

Join Paula’s Thursday’s Special: Pick a Word in January

CFFC: With the Letter “O”

Osiris

Osiris, Wall Painting, Temple of Amana, now located at New Amana, Nubia, Egypt

Wall painting of the god Osiris in the Temple of Amana. The Temple of Amana, the oldest Egyptian temple in Nubia, was saved from the rising waters of Lake Nasser during the construction of the Aswan High Dam.  The temple was saved by France, in an effort by over 50 countries to save the monuments and buildings of ancient Nubia.

CFFC: The Letter “O” Anywhere in the Word

CFFC: Starts with Ap

Apsara

Apsara, Angkor Wat, Angkor Temple Complex, Siem Reap, Cambodia

An apsara is a female spirit of the clouds and waters in Hindu and Buddhist mythology. Apsaras are a common motif on temples and other buildings throughout  Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, and other parts of Southeast Asia. Often translated as nymph or muse, the depiction of apsaras differ in each culture. Dancing apsara in bas-relief  decorate the walls of Angkor Wat, the largest temple (AD 1116–1150) in Angkor Archaeological Park, and the largest religious monument in the world .

Join Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge: Starts with Ap

%d bloggers like this: