Ancient Bricks

Brick construction, side wall, Pantheion, 113–125 AD, Rome, Italy

Join Cee’s Black & White Photo Challenge: Stones or Bricks

Lines Squared #28

Coffered Lines

The Pantheon, Rome, Italy

Join Becky from The Life of B for October Squares #28. There are only two rules. The image must be square and must relate to the October theme: lines&squares.

Ancient Shadows

Satyr in Shadow

 

Satyr’s Head, Roman, mid 2nd century CE, Marble, Gulbenkian Museum, Lisbon, Portugal

Join Lens-Artists Challenge #32: Shadows

Thursday’s Special: Zoom In/Zoom Out

Zooming in on Isis

Roman shrine to the Goddess Isis, Luxor, Egypt. The restored shrine is near the first pylon of the Temple of Luxor and adjacent to the Avenue of the Sphinxes.

Join Paula’s Thursday’s Special: Zoom In/Zoom Out

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Time

Towering Time

16th Century Clock Tower, Aix-en-Provence, France

The back side of the clock tower in Place de l’Hotel de Ville, Aix-en-Provence, France. Located next to the City Hall, the tower was built in 1510. It is topped with a 16th century wrought iron cage that houses a bell, which still rings the hours of the day. White limestone blocks from a Roman era structure were support the base of the tower.  Facing away from the plaza, this clock face is simple and utilitarian. The front of the clock tower (oops, I missed getting that shot) is much more ornate and includes a 17th century astronomical clock and an 18th century urn commemorating the spirits of those who died in the French Revolution.

 

Tuesday Photo Challenge: Bird

Bird House

Roman mosaic tile floor, House of the Birds, 2nd-century, Italica, Spain

Italica, a Roman colony in western Andalusia, was founded in 206 BCE as a settlement for Roman soldiers. Italica rose to prominence in the 1st- and 2nd-centuries, during the reigns of the Roman Emperors Trajan and Hadrian, both of whom were born in Italica. Several 2nd-century houses, with elaborate mosaic floors, have been excavated in the Hadrianic city (new city). The floor in the House of the Bird Mosaic consists of 35 small squares, each containing a different bird, surrounding a larger, central scene. According to our tour guide, the center square was stolen.  Because it was never built over, this elite quarter is unusually well-preserved, with  remains of spacious houses, cobbled streets, an aqueduct, and a sewer/drainage system. Portions of the drains can still be seen.

 

Join Frank’s Tuesday Photo Challenge: Bird

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