Pick A Word In April: All About Lions

The Lions of the Masai Mara

Resplendent

Male lion resting inn the shade, Masi Mara National Park, Kenya

Alluring

Pride of lionesses resting in shade of bushes, Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

Plagued

Tow lionesses plagued by flies, Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

Copycats

Lionesses resting in Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

Timeworn

Aging Lioness missing one eye, Masai Mara National Park, Kenya

Join Paula’s Thursday Special: Pick a Word in April  Y4

Pick a Word for March: Corniculate

Masai Giraffe

Masi Giraffe, Male, Masi Mara, Kenya

The Masai giraffe, also called Kilimanjaro giraffe, is the largest and tallest of the nine giraffe subspecies. It is native to East Africa and is found in central and southern Kenya and in Tanzania. Its distinctive jagged patches extend down the limbs to the hooves. Males have darker patches than females and the color difference increases with age; the dominant males have the darkest pattern. Adult males can reach a height of 19.5 feet and females can reach between 16 and 18 feet, making it the tallest land animal on earth.

A giraffe is the only animal born with horns. Both male and female giraffes are born with two horn-like structures, called ossicones, made of hard cartilage atop their heads. At birth, the ossicones are covered in skin and a fine layer of hair. The male’s ossicones are typically rounded at the top and bald;  the female’s ossicones are usually thinner and have a tuft of hair on the ends. Males develop an extra bump on the forehead.

Join Paula at Lost in Translation for Thursday’s Special: Pick a Word in March – Y4: Corniculate

Vocabulary Travels

” . . . is the word”

I usually only pick one of Paula’s great words but I was inspired to do four because I haven’t been posting much recently.

 

Join Paula’s Thursday’s Special: Pick a Word in January – Y4

Christmas Carnations

Pale Pink Christmas

Fresh carnations decorate Christmas tree at Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, the house museum of Marjorie Merriweather Post, Washington, DC

Fresh pale pink carnations decorate a Christmas tree at Hillwood Estate, Museum & Gardens, the house/museum of Marjorie Merriweather Post, Washington, DC.  Post was one of the wealthiest women in the United States in her day. She collected French and Russian art and left her Washington, DC, estate and art collection as a museum.

Join Paula’s Pick a Word in December-Y 3: Pale Pink  (I am a bit behind. :))

Thursday’s Special: Pick a Word in October – Aperture

Architectural Aperture

Mintmaster’s Mansion,built1683, decoration and furnishings from the mid-1700’s, Den Gamle By (Old Town), Aarhus, Denmark

Aperture is defined in relation to photography as “a space through which light passes in an optical or photographic instrument, especially the variable opening by which light enters a camera.” I think door frames qualify as architectural apertures.

Join Paula’s Thursday’s Special: Pick a Word in October (Y3).  Pick from one or more of the five words Paula has selected for October.  

Backroads America: Submerged

Returned to the Wild

Section of the C&O Canal in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, along Berm Road, near Hancock, Maryland

Trees growing in the historic Chesapeake and Ohio (C&O) Canal in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historical Park, along Berm Road, near Hancock, Maryland. By design, the 19th-century canal ran parallel to the Potomac River in the states of Maryland, West Virginia, and Virginia. The 185 mile canal moved coal, lumber, and agricultural products down from Cumberland, Maryland to markets in Georgetown, Virginia. Built between 1828 and 1850, plans originally called for the canal to connect to the Ohio River; exorbitant costs and construction issue resulted in the canal terminating in Cumberland. Goods began moving down the lower section of the canal in 1831. But even as canal construction continued, the newly expanding railroad system brought competition to the waterway. The canal’s best years in the early 1870s were followed by an economic depression and several devastating floods. After another flood in 1924, canal operations ceased and no further repairs undertaken. By then, the railroad had captured most of the regions trade.

In a way, though, the railroads  are responsible for the preservation of  the historic and natural features of the canal. In 1889, a flood forced the canal company into receivership, and the B&O Railroad bought the majority of the canal’s bonds. In 1938 the railroad sold the entire canal to the U.S. Government for $2 million, and it was placed under the supervision of the National Park Service. In 1961 President Eisenhower designated it a national monument, and  in 1971 Congress authorized the C & O Canal a National Historical Park. Check out the Park’s website for information  walking and biking trails, information centers, and other activities in the park.  The Western Maryland Rail Trail runs along the canal in this area.

Join Paula’s THURSDAY’S SPECIAL: PICK A WORD IN AUGUST – Y3

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